All sites will be closed on Monday, April 16, 2018 for Patriots’ Day.

image of flowers that form a pink ribbonOctober is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, providing a great opportunity for individuals to learn more about the disease. Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point.

The good news is that most women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early. A mammogram, the screening test for breast cancer, can help find breast cancer early when it’s easier to treat. Here at Community Health Connections, we’ll schedule your mammogram as part of our women’s health services.

If you’re concerned about breast cancer, you might be wondering if there are steps you can take toward breast cancer prevention. Some risk factors, such as family history, can’t be changed. However, there are lifestyle changes you can make to lower your risk.

What you can do to reduce your risk of breast cancer

Lifestyle changes have been shown in studies to decrease breast cancer risk even in high-risk women. The following are steps you can take to lower your risk:

  • Limit alcohol. The more alcohol you drink, the greater your risk of developing breast cancer. The general recommendation — based on research on the effect of alcohol on breast cancer risk — is to limit yourself to less than 1 drink per day as even small amounts increase risk.
  • Don’t smoke. Accumulating evidence suggests a link between smoking and breast cancer risk, particularly in premenopausal women. In addition, not smoking is one of the best things you can do for your overall health.
  • Control your weight. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of breast cancer. This is especially true if obesity occurs later in life, particularly after menopause.
  • Be physically active. Physical activity can help you maintain a healthy weight, which, in turn, helps prevent breast cancer. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly, plus strength training at least twice a week.
  • Breast-feed. Breast-feeding might play a role in breast cancer prevention. The longer you breast-feed, the greater the protective effect.
  • Limit dose and duration of hormone therapy. Combination hormone therapy for more than three to five years increases the risk of breast cancer. If you’re taking hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms, ask your doctor about other options. You might be able to manage your symptoms with non-hormonal therapies and medications. If you decide that the benefits of short-term hormone therapy outweigh the risks, use the lowest dose that works for you and continue to have your doctor monitor the length of time you are taking hormones.
  • Avoid exposure to radiation and environmental pollution. Medical-imaging methods, such as computerized tomography, use high doses of radiation. While more studies are needed, some research suggests a link between breast cancer and radiation exposure. Reduce your exposure by having such tests only when absolutely necessary.

For more information about breast cancer visit:  https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer.html

Fitchburg Community Health Center

Community Health Connections fitchburg

326 Nichols Road, Fitchburg, MA
978-878-8100

Gardner Community Health Center

Community Health Connections Gardner

175 Connors Street, Gardner, MA
978-878-8100

Leominster Community Health Center

Community Health Connections Leominster

14 Manning Avenue, Leominster, MA
978-878-8100

ACTION Community Health Center

Community Health Connections Action

130 Water Street, Fitchburg, MA
978-878-8100

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